Fireside Chat #04: Cognitive-Behavioural Approaches in Managing Pain




In the fourth instalment of our Fireside Chat series, we have Dr Adriana Banozic, a trained psychologist and neuroscientist, to share the goals of cognitive behavioural therapy in pain management.


Cognitive-Behavioural Approaches in Managing Pain

About 8.7% of individuals in Singapore live with chronic pain. In understanding pain, it is important to emphasize that there is an overlap between psychological factors (how pain is perceived, understood and emotionally processed), other comorbidities and acute and chronic pain.

A common misconception about pain is that it is best treated with a purely biomedical approach. On the contrary, other factors can be integral to the experience of pain and may significantly reduce the need for medical treatment.


During the fireside chat, Dr Adriana will present CBT goals in pain management that include reducing the impact pain has on one's daily life, learning skills for better coping with pain, improving physical and emotional functioning and well-being, and reducing reliance on pain medication.

Some of the benefits of CBT include helping the person understand where the negative thinking comes from and show them how to respond to pain in a less threatening way, so they can have a better quality of life.


This is part of CAL’s engagement to empowerment (E2E) programme in which we seek to Engage more, Equip more and Empower more, helping caregivers to achieve a higher level of well-being and resilience.


Speaker Background

Dr Adriana Banozic, PhD, is a trained psychologist and neuroscientist with an executive education in Implementing Public Policy from Harvard Kennedy School. She specialises in managing cross-functional environments using consensus building, and communicating complex issues in simple and concise language for multiple audiences.


Since 2014, Dr Adriana has been involved in various research projects with A*STAR, NUS, and CREATE, and has significant experience in developing and managing research-policy partnerships in Singapore and the region.